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Navy Chaplain offers pay to pray

A former Navy chaplain is offering a reward to any student who says a prayer during a graduation ceremony at a school in Florida following a lawsuit by an atheist group aimed at banning religious utterances from the event.

Radical: the new legalism

Today’s Millennial generation is being fed the message that if they don’t do something extraordinary in this life they are wasting their gifts and potential. The sad result is that many young adults feel ashamed if they “settle” into ordinary jobs, get married early and start families, live in small towns, or as 1 Thess 4:11 says, “aspire to live quietly, and to mind [their] affairs, and to work with [their] hands.” For too many Millennials their greatest fear in this life is being an ordinary person with a non-glamorous job, living in the suburbs, and having nothing spectacular to boast about.

Christian evangelism = rape?

The Pentagon is evaluating its guide on religious tolerance with the help of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation (MRFF), an organization that has compared evangelism to “rape” and wants military personnel who “proselytize” to be court-martialed. MRFF President Mikey Weinstein, who met privately with Pentagon officials last week, says U.S. troops who proselytize are guilty of sedition and treason and should be punished in order to push back what he calls a “tidal wave of fundamentalists.” “Someone needs to be punished for this. Until the Air Force or Army or Navy or Marine Corps punishes a member of the military for unconstitutional religious proselytizing and oppression, we will never have the ability to stop this horrible, horrendous, dehumanizing behavior.”

Orthodoxy winning the war over Christianity

Small wonder, given the harrowing times recently, that news about a long-running property fight over a picturesque church in northern Virginia escaped most people’s notice. But the story of the struggle over the historic Falls Church is nonetheless worth a closer look. It’s one more telling example of a little-acknowledged truth: though religious traditionalism may be losing today’s political and legal battles, it remains poised to win the wider war over what Christianity will look like tomorrow

George Jones: Troubadour of the South

Some may see hypocrisy in the fact that Jones sang gospel songs. The same emotion with which he sang of drunkenness and honky-tonking, he turned to sing of “Just a Little Talk with Jesus Makes Things Right.” He often in concerts led the crowd in old gospel favorites, such as “Amazing Grace” or “I’ll Fly Away.” But I don’t think this is hypocrisy. This is not a man branding himself with two different and contradictory impulses. This was a man who sang of the horrors of sin, with a longing for a gospel he had heard and, it seemed, he hoped could deliver him. In Jones’ songs, you hear the old Baptist and Pentecostal fear that maybe, horrifically, one has passed over into the stage of Esau who, as the Bible puts it, “could not find repentance though he sought it with tears.”

The sex lives of unmarried evangelicals

Food isn’t the answer to hunger

But was it the right kind of aid? The Acehnese who lost their livelihoods needed food, but there was actually plenty of food to be bought. Indonesia’s foreign minister told the world not to send rice. The coast had been devastated, but not far inland life was normal— in fact, harvests had been excellent. What was disrupting the food market was not the tsunami, but the sacks of rice that were coming in. So many people were getting rice for free that local markets couldn’t sell it. Farmers were undercut and supply chains fell apart.